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Joshua White
May 07, 2021
This Lord's Day Bulletin and Order of Service content media
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Joshua White
Feb 20, 2021
In General Discussions
(Letters of John Newton) Rom 15:7  "Therefore receive one another, just as Christ also received us, to the glory of God." The Christian, especially he who is advanced and established in the life of faith, has a fervent zeal for God—for the honor of His Name, His Word and His Gospel. The honest warmth of zeal which he feels, when God's Word is broken, His Gospel is despised, and when the great and glorious Name of the Lord his God is profaned, would, by the occasion of his infirmities, often degenerate into anger or contempt towards those who error—if he was under the influence of zeal alone. But his zeal is blended with benevolence and humility; it is softened by a consciousness of his own frailty and fallibility. He is aware, that his knowledge is very limited in itself, and very faint in its transforming power in his own life; that his attainments are weak and few, compared with his deficiencies; that his gratitude is very disproportionate to his obligations; and that his obedience is unspeakably short of conformity to his prescribed rule; that he has nothing but what he has received, and has received nothing but what, in a greater or less degree, he has either misapplied or misimproved. He is, therefore, a debtor to the mercy of God—and lives upon His multiplied forgiveness. The Christian also makes the gracious conduct of the Lord towards himself—a pattern for his own conduct towards his fellow-worms. He cannot boast of himself—nor is he anxious to censure others. He considers himself, lest he also fall. And thus he learns tenderness and compassion to others, and to bear patiently with those mistakes, blemishes and faults in others—which once belonged to his own character; and from which, as yet, he is but imperfectly freed. He therefore acts in character, as the follower of Him who was compassionate towards the infirmities and mistakes of His disciples, and taught them gradually, as they were able to bear it—and not everything at once. But then, the same considerations which inspire him with meekness and gentleness towards those who oppose the truth—strengthen his regard for the truth itself, and his conviction of its importance. For the sake of peace, which he loves and cultivates—he accommodates himself, as far as he lawfully can, to the weaknesses and mistakes of other sincere Christians; though he is thereby exposed to be censured by 'bigots' of all parties, who deem him flexible and wavering, like a reed shaken with the wind. But there are other fundamental points, essential to the Gospel, which are the foundations of his hope, and the sources of his joy. For his firm attachment to these, he is content to be treated as a 'bigot' himself! For here he is immovable as an iron pillar; nor can either the fear or the favor of man prevail on him to yield the truth of the Gospel, no not for an hour! (Galatians 2:5). Here his judgment is fixed; and he expresses it in simple and unequivocal language, so as not to leave either friends or enemies in suspense, concerning the side which he has chosen, or the cause which is nearest to his heart. Knowing that the Gospel is the wisdom and power of God, and the only possible means by which fallen man can obtain peace with God—he most cordially embraces and avows it. Far from being ashamed of it—he esteems it his glory. He preaches Christ Jesus, and Him crucified. He disdains the thought of distorting, disguising, or softening the great doctrines of the grace of God, to render them more palatable to the depraved taste of the times (2 Corinthians 4:2). And he will no more encounter the errors and corrupt maxims and practices of the world, with any weapon but the truth as it is in Jesus—than he would venture to fight an enraged tiger with a paper sword!
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Joshua White
Feb 19, 2021
In General Discussions
(J.A. James, "Christian Fellowship" 1822) Christians should excel in the manifestation of Christ's character. The mind which was in Jesus, should be in them. They should consider His character as a model of their own; and be conspicuous for their . . . poverty of spirit, meekness, gentleness, and love. It is matter of surprise and regret, that many people seem to think that Christianity has nothing to do with character! And that provided they are free from gross sins, and have lively feelings in devotional exercises, they may be as petulant, irritable, and implacable as they please! This is a dreadful error, and has done great mischief to the cause of God! A sour, ill-natured Christian is like a lamb with a wolf's head; or like a dove with a vulture's beak! If there be any one word which above all others should describe a Christian's character, it is that which represents his divine Father; and as it is said, that 'God is love', so should it be also affirmed, that a Christian is love--love embodied, an incarnation of love! His words, his conduct, his very looks--should be so many expressions of love! Eph 4:29-5:2 Let no corrupting talk come out of your mouths, but only such as is good for building up, as fits the occasion, that it may give grace to those who hear. And do not grieve the Holy Spirit of God, by whom you were sealed for the day of redemption. Let all bitterness and wrath and anger and clamor and slander be put away from you, along with all malice. Be kind to one another, tenderhearted, forgiving one another, as God in Christ forgave you. Therefore be imitators of God, as beloved children. And walk in love, as Christ loved us and gave himself up for us, a fragrant offering and sacrifice to God.
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Joshua White
Feb 17, 2021
In Resources for Growth
Published under the oversight of my dear friend Gary Long, this is an excellent work on the history of American Baptist's. Covering early baptist hymnology, theology and biographical sketches of American Baptist pastors, this work is an excellent introduction to our heritage as baptists in America.
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Joshua White
Feb 17, 2021
In Resources for Growth
Written by my friend, and a man who has prayed for us as a church in its early stages, Jeremy Walker has done an excellent job of introducing one of the premier Baptist theologians in history. It is an encouragemant as well as a vehicle of conviction to follow our Lord Jesus Christ.
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Joshua White
Feb 17, 2021
In Resources for Growth
Regardless of your eschatilogical view, this is a must read for anyone who uphoalds a baptistic covenant theology. It is plainly written and easily read. It will lead you to glorify God in His redemptive work through Christ Jesus our Lord.
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Joshua White
Feb 17, 2021
In General Discussions
You have often heard me say, "It is important that we read the dead guys." One of the reasons that I have said this time and again is due to the fact that there is nothing new under the sun. The very same theological battles that are fought today, were fought over the centuries of church history. The plain truth is that we must work through doctrinal issues through the lens of Scripture. But in our modern age we have the benefit of the help of those "living stones" of the past. One of the questions posed by a particular Baptist pastor of 300 years ago is applicable to our current age. "Do you read the scriptures to come up with something to say to others, or do you read the Scriptures to feed your own soul? (Paraphrase)" This quote alone proves that one who is seeking to grow in the faith should read the men of the past while being a barean and seeking the truth of Scripture. Thoughts?
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Joshua White
Feb 14, 2021
In Daily Life
(John Angell James, "Christian Love") "If I have the gift of prophecy and can fathom all mysteries and all knowledge, and if I have a faith that can move mountains, but have not love, I am nothing!" 1 Corinthians 13:2 LOVE is a grace which many professing Christians think far too little about; but it is of infinite value in the eyes of God. Love is the most characteristic feature of Christ's image in a renewed man. Love is the most precious fruit of grace; and yet the fruit which too many of His professed followers seem to think themselves hardly under any obligation to cultivate. Christian love is that benevolent disposition or kindness, which consists in good-will to all creatures, and which leads us as we have opportunity, to promote their happiness. The apostle has given us a description of the exercises of this noble and god-like principle: "Love is patient" and forbearing under injuries and annoyances; and does not revile, revenge, or retaliate. "Love is kind," not harsh or crude—but ever ready, willing, and pleased by looks, words, and actions, to promote the comfort of others. "Love does not envy." It does not pine and grieve at the sight of another's superior possessions, fame, happiness, or piety—or dislike him on that account. "Love does not boast. Love is not proud." It neither boasts its own gifts, achievements, and possessions; nor despises others, nor makes insulting comparisons—but is humble and gentle. "Love does not behave unseemly." It modestly keeps its place, and does nothing to offend by what is unfitting its rank, station, or circumstances. "Love seeks not her own." It does not selfishly want to have its own way, or promote its own interest—to the neglect of others. "Love is not easily provoked." It governs its temper, controls its passions, and is not soon or unreasonably irritable or petulant. "Love thinks no evil." It is not censorious, nor forward to impute a bad motive to a doubtful action—but is disposed to put the best construction on the actions and words of others. "Love rejoices not in iniquity, but rejoices in the truth." It does not delight in the sins—but in the excellences of an opponent. "Love bears (or covers) all things." It does not divulge, proclaim, aggravate faults—but hides them as far as it can, and it is right to do so. "Love believes all things," that are to the advantage of another. "Love hopes all things," where there is not sufficient evidence to authorize belief. "Love endures all things," bears hardships, sustains labor, makes sacrifices—in order to accomplish its purposes of good-will. Such is love in exercise and act. This is benevolence—this is a regard to the happiness of others. Whoever acts thus, must promote happiness. He must bless all around him. All things smile in his presence. Beautiful description! Heavenly temper! Godlike mind! Now, dear friends, look at love! Gaze upon it's lovely form, its beautiful countenance, its graceful actings. Observe its seraphic glow, its divine temper, until you are all enamored with its charms. But look at it not only as something to be admired—but to be possessed and practiced. Unless this is your temperament, you are not Christians. I do not say you cannot be Christians unless you have love in perfection. But you must have the principle of love, and must be living in its exercise. You are Christians no further than you live under its influence. No matter what knowledge you may have of the doctrines of the gospel; what seeming faith you may possess; what zeal you may manifest; what liberality you may exercise; what regularity, and punctuality in attendance upon the means of grace you may maintain—if love is lacking, all this is of no avail. Nothing can be a substitute for love. Christianity is love not a slavish attendance on ceremonies, not receiving the sacraments, not zeal for orthodoxy, not a form of church government, not belonging to any particular church. God's eternal thoughts and purposes in election, Christ's redeeming work upon the cross, the Spirit's omnipotent agency in regeneration, are not merely to bring us under a particular ecclesiastical regimen—but to deliver us from the dominion of selfishness, and place us under the reign of love, and thus make us like God! If an individual is destitute of love, he has no saving religion. He may be zealous for the forms of Christianity, but he is destitute of its living spirit. And now, my dear friends, let me entreat you to examine yourselves concerning this great essential of the Christian character: Are you experimentally acquainted with this disposition? Is this your religion? Is your temperament thus molded? Is that one word 'love' characteristic of your spirit? Has God's love to you, changed you into its own likeness? Do you know what it is to have pride, passion, envy, malice, selfishness—subdued, repressed, resisted—by a meek, gentle, lowly, forgiving, forbearing, generous, self-denying temper? Are the harshness, hardness, asperity of the fallen nature—displaced by the softness, sweetness, and kindness of true love?
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Joshua White
Feb 13, 2021
In Book Club
One of the things that hits me every time I read faithful Baptists of the past is the simplicity with which they saw and communicated the Scriptures. Leaning not to their own understanding, they were less prepared to enter the realm of Christian philosophy and much more apt to simply read and restate the truth of God’s word. This is what we find in John Gill’s work that we are currently reading. The question is simple, where in Scripture is the gospel ordinance of Baptism instituted? The NT! Where then are we to find the answers to it’s application ? The NT! No need to interpret the ordinances through the lens of the OT rites and rituals. A wise pastor once told me, “Interpret the difficult passages of Scripture by looking to the plain passages of Scripture.” Wise words indeed. Thoughts?
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Joshua White
Apr 01, 2020
In COVID Land
So, I am interested in hearing everyone’s thoughts concerning the pandemic that is plaguing the world and the resulting reactions to it. It seems to me that there are many opinions about the issue. My question to all of you is whether or not you have a well thought out biblical response. What say you?
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Joshua White
Apr 01, 2020
In General Discussions
Use this space to discuss doctrine and theology....or just fellowship with one another
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Joshua White
Apr 01, 2020
In General Discussions
Please feel free to share your prayer and praise requests here!
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